White brands: heroes or villains?

White brands: heroes or villains?

IE Focus | By Carmen Abril, Professor at IE Business School

Things are not often black or white, but rather tend to come in varying shades of gray. The world of white brands is no exception. They are no better or worse than other products, but they are certainly competitive.We are currently witnessing a controversial debate on white brands in Spain owing to the rapid growth they have enjoyed in recent months, where they have reached 38% of the sales of packaged large-consumption products.

As a result of this situation, which, on the other hand, is nothing new, many manufacturers, such as Danone, Nabisco and Kellogg´s, among others, have launched a massive advertising campaign to clarify certain concepts that consumers supposedly confuse regarding the manufacture of white brands in the hope that the message hampers their growth.

The importance of the issue and the controversy it has caused is worth taking a look at. First of all, we should start by giving this type of brand its correct name: if, by white brands, we understand undistinguished products based purely on their composition and ingredients and directly comparable with others, such as generic drugs, the name given to these products is incorrect.

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International experts in Social Entrepreneurship meet at IE University

On July  9, 10 and 11 IE University, in collaboration with the Social Entrepreneurship and Education Consortium (SEEC), hosted a conference for international experts in Social Entrepreneurship in Segovia.  This event, organized by IE professor Rachida Justo, was the first international workshop in Spain on Social Entrepreneurship. The conference was joined by experts from over 20…

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Free Competition and Good Strife

IE Focus: Free Competition and Good StrifeIE Focus | By Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui. Professor. IE School of Arts & Humanities
In the light of recent events the dogmas of economic theory have been brought into question, with perhaps one exception: free competition, as defended by the Ancient Greeks.
Many dogmas of classical economical theory have been hastily reviewed in recent times. But I am led to believe that there is one which resists criticism from almost all sides, apart from a few nostalgic diehards. Free competition seems to stand today as a pillar of new and revised models much as it always has from the times of Adam Smith. The first theories on the benefits of competition are, however, much older. In Greece, more than 2,700 years ago, Hesiod began his Works and Days with these lines (see this previous post on translation of ancient poetry).
So there was not only one race of Strifes, but all over the earth
there are two. A man would praise the first one after understanding her.
The other is blameworthy: and their spirit is wholly different.
For one fosters evil war and battle,
being cruel. No man loves her, but men, forced
by the will of the inmortals, pay honour to harsh Strife.
But the other was born the first from dark Night,
and the son of Cronos, who sits above and dwells in the aether, set her
in the roots of the earth: and she is much better for men.
She wakes up even the shiftless to work;
for a man grows eager to work when he sees another
rich man who hastens to plough and plant
and put his house in good order; and neighbour vies with his neighbour
as he hurries after wealth. This Strife is good for mortals
And potter is angry with potter, and craftsman with craftsman,
and beggar is jealous of beggar, and bard of bard.
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