IE University will be one of Europe´s most prestigious centres of learning: Rector Santiago Iniguez

zaryn-dentzel-y-santiago-iniguez-web.jpgThe University inaugurates its first academic year with two new degrees in Architecture and Communication that are fully compliant with the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). In his address during the inauguration of the first academic year of the new international university model launched by IE in April of this year, Santiago Iñiguez de Onzoño, Rector of IE University  stated that â??The university we are building will be one of Europeâ??s most prestigious centers of learning, in line with the achievements of our business schoolâ?.

The Rector described IE University as â??A private institution with a public mission: that of educating global citizens, entrepreneurs who are committed to society and have an excellent working knowledge of their fields.â? He went on to underscore the fact that IE Universityâ??s innovative, market-oriented programs will also equip graduates with a solid grounding in humanities and management, given that â??humanities are the binding agent that integrate other knowledge, and the base for shaping individuals in the fullest sense of the wordâ?. Iñiguez de Onzoño also spoke about how behind every good business practice there is a good management practice, which is why IE University graduatesâ?? education will be equivalent to that of an MBA graduate, in that they will be entrepreneurial in their fields, change agents in their profession, and generators of value and social well-being.

After speaking about the Universityâ??s  two new degree programs  in Architecture and Communication launched at the beginning of the academic year, both of which are adapted to the European Higher Education Area, Íñiguez de Onzoño announced that in the next academic year, following the receipt of the pertinent approval, IE Universityâ??s Santa Cruz la Real campus is set to launch new degrees in Business Administration,  Biology, Law, History of Art, Construction Engineering, Journalism and Audiovisual Communication, Psychology, Tourism Management, and Systems and Technologies. â??One of the key features of these new degree programs will be their markedly international slant in terms of content, student profile, Spanish and English versions, strategic alliances and exchanges with leading international universities, and relations with global business organizations and institutions.

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The way Darwin would see it

1594.jpgOctober 2008 | By Antonio Rivela, Professor at IE Business School

One of the collateral effects of the crisis is a purge of the entire system as Darwinâ??s famous survival of the fittest kicks in. But should all species be left to fend for themselves?

What should the central banks do to combat the recession? That is the question asked constantly by investment banks, politicians, legislators and people on the street. Many players on the market will see a digital answer to the question.

Should they inject funds indiscriminately into the system from the public treasury to correct the upset caused by the investment banks? Or should they be allowed to fall in pure Darwinian survival-of-the-fittest style? On this particular occasion I happen to think that it depends on each case.

There are banks which, owing to their status, help the financial system on a structural scale. They can be compared with the age-old trees that form a basis for an ecosystem. Without them, no animal would be able to exist. The latest examples are the agencies that support the mortgage system in the United States, affectionately known as Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, since their initials are unpronounceable, believe me. I think it is blatantly obvious that these institutions should be helped in order to avoid a potential collapse of the United States property market, which could have been comparable with the 1929 recession. In these two cases, the Fed was correct to inject $100 billion into each institution.

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