6
Aug

architecture.jpgIE University has reinvented university education with its new degree in architecture, one of the international universityâ??s flagship programmes for the academic year 2008-2009. The new degree is run in English and Spanish and will combine online and onsite training with internships whereby students can gain work experience in other countries and learn languages. The new degree programme comprise forward looking course content and comply with the requirements of the Bologna process, which is set to align the European university map by 2010. IE University will be competing with leading international universities, with a student body set to comprise 80% international students in two yearsâ?? time.

The new degree in architecture is poised to make its mark on the international arena of architectural design, providing a new platform for creativity in the field of architecture where design and innovation meet management.
The IE School of Architecture has a markedly international focus, and has partnered with leading institutions that include the prestigious Architecture Association in London (UK), Evtek Institute of Art and Design in Finland, Politécnico de Milán and Bauhaus Universität de Dessau in Germany, to further enrich the studentsâ?? learning experience. We are interviewing the Dean, Javier Quintana:

What are the key differentiating features of the BA and MA in Architecture?
The BA and MA in Architecture combine excellence and design, innovation in terms of method and content, and a management toolkit for creative teams in the field of architecture. From an international and applied perspective, the programme brings the opportunity to address leading edge issues with a professional mindset and latest generation management tools. We want to train architects who will run architecture studios, not work for someone else.

The programme is highly flexible in that it is designed to serve as a continuation of programmes in similar leading international education centres. It combines the basic professional accreditation requirements not only for Spain but also for the rest of Europe and the U.S. Apart from learning about business organization and management (the IE module), we include specific workshops where we integrate knowledge across architectonic disciplines (projects, structures, installations, etc.) and also those related to the world of architecture (photography, software, etc.).

Finally, and through an ambitious internship programme and online methodology, students will have access to a relevant professional experience that will enable them to be extremely competitive from the moment they finish their degree.

What is the profile of an IE School of Architecture student?
We seek designers and players in the changing field of architecture, enthusiasts that live and breathe creation, and who have entrepreneurial spirit and a capacity to lead the change needed in this profession. They are young people who have a vocation for architecture and want to use it as a tool to bring about change. We are also looking for citizens of the world who want an academic experience that requires a global mentality. People who see their training as an international experience that they can use to acquire perspective. And, of course, we are looking for those with an acute awareness of the richness of architecture, and who see it as a place where technique meets culture. These humanists of the future will use their education to assume responsibility.

How long will it last? And will you offer postgraduate learning?
The degree in architecture will be a five year course which can be reduced to four years for students who opt to do an internship in international firms. With regard to postgraduate possibilities, IE School of Architecture offers titles that include the MDWS (Master in Design of Work Space), the MBA (Master in Business and Architecture) or the MNA (Master in Architectural Narrative).

If you wish to learn more about the BA & MA in Architecture, please visit the IE School of Architecture.

5
Aug

Ferran Adrià: The Alchemist of the Senses

Written on August 5, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Explore IE

ferran-adria1.jpgFerran Adrià is featured in the current edition of the IDEAS magazine, the IE Business School Alumni Magazine. Read this interesting interview with the considered to be best chef running the considered to be best restaurant in the world, in Spain!

Today, he has become a living legend of the gastronomic universe. His proposition? Demonstrate that cooking is the best expression of intelligence and creativity.

There is a clear connection between Ferran Adriàâ??s work and the various artistic and philosophical trends of the 20th century, from surrealism to the new critique of the theoretical movement of deconstruction… His gift can be compared with that of other Spaniards, such as the painters Salvador Dalí, Pablo Picasso and Joan Miró, or the film director Luis Buñuel.â? These have been the arguments put forward by the Scottish University of Aberdeen to award Ferran Adrià the title of doctor honoris causa in Humanities â??for his contribution to contemporary thoughtâ?. The comparison Aberdeen made between Adrià and artists who have stood out -but until recently of minor importance as far as the Spanish public is concerned- is surprising at the very least. It would appear that eccentricity is more recognized than excellence, as if both qualities were incompatible and the â??fusionâ? never happened.The son of a plasterer, he preferred not to do a degree in business and launched himself on the adventure of finding summer work in restaurants and tapas bars on the Spanish coast. However, destiny had already outlined his name in capital letters. During his military service in the Navy in Cartagena, he decided to accept a friendâ??s proposal to start work as the kitchen hand in elBulli, a restaurant already of known prestige of which, interestingly, he had not heard until that moment. The restaurant was located in Cala Montjoi, 6 km from Roses (Gerona).

Today, elBulli has three Michelin stars, opens only seven months a year, and offers almost zero possibility for booking a table. All thanks to the genius of this masterchef, a simple man of few words, but owner of a brain that is constantly simmering. Read more…

4
Aug

IE Global MBA – a personal experience

Written on August 4, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Go for IE

photo-110.jpgGary Delaney is current student of IEâ??s Global MBA program and talks about his impressions of the program. Gary is involved in technical security and risk management being an SME in architecture, incident management, forensics and security strategy. He worked in financial institutions and security consultancies in Ireland, UK and Australia and is currently employed at National Australia Bank in Sydney. Gary owns a BSc (Hons) Economics and  Graduate Diploma in Business and holds several professional qualifications including CISSP and SANS.

Q: Gary, why did you choose the Global MBA at IE Business School instead of a local part-time program in Australia? Where is for you the value added to do it with IE?
A: I chose the GMBA for a number of reasons: (1) the ranking and reputation of the business school is far higher than the two major Australian institutions. (2) I felt that IE and the Global MBA would have a more international focus than these institutions. (3) The online delivery allowed me to manage my time more efficiently. The prescribed 18 month completion time frame made the programme more attractive than the more flexible Australian offerings.

Q: How is the learning experience?
A: The learning experience is very good. The interaction with fellow students is excellent through the various technologies available to us including the Online Campus, Skype, Messenger etc. The experience on a course by course basis is very much a function of the level of participation of the professor. When the professor is highly active in the forum I find the level of knowledge acquisition to be at its highest.
Additionally, I would categorise the course as intense with a big commitment in terms of time and effort. I would suggest that the quality of learning is highly dependent on how well the student engages with the programme.

Q: Can you network online?
A: Yes, surprisingly effectively using ieCommunities, Facebook, Skype and email. It is not a substitute for face to face discussions but it does allow you to establish effective relationships.

Q: How does your employer value this program?
A: My employer is probably neutral on the program. They have provided some financial support but they perhaps struggle to identify how the MBA can be practically applied within the business unit that I work. It is my job to show them how :)

Thank you very much, Gary, for your contributions!

The IE Global MBA is considered one of the best distance learning programs in the world (Economist Intelligence Unit, January 2007) and runs as an online program during 16 months with the full MBA syllabus and a strong focus on Entrepreneurship. If you wish to learn more about the program, please visit the Global MBA website.


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1
Aug

IE School of Arts & Humanities joins the CHCI

Written on August 1, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in IE University

chcilogo01.jpgThe Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes extended an official membership invitation to IE’s School of Arts and Humanities. The Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) serves as a site for the discussion of issues germane to the fostering of cross-disciplinary activity and as a network for the circulation of information and the sharing of resources. It has a membership of over one hundred and fifty centers and institutes that are remarkably diverse in size and scope and are located in the United States, Australia, Canada, Finland, Taiwan, Ireland, Sri Lanka, the United Kingdom, and other countries. CHCI is an affiliate member with the American Council of Learned Societies.

CHCI includes such prestigious members as the Stanford Humanities Center (Stanford University), the Franke Institute for the Humanities (University of Chicago), the Whitney Humanities Center (Yale University), the Humanities Center in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Harvard University), The Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (University of Cambridge) and The Camargo Foundation (The Jerome Foundation).

The Dean of the School of Arts and Humanities, Arantza de Areilza emphasized that “IE´s School of Arts and Humanities is very pleased to be part of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes, an organization that shares our interest in the development of international collaboration among the world leading Humanities centers and institutions for the improvement of Humanities education models, research projects and faculty development”.

IE’s School of Arts and Humanities, which was officially launched on April 10th 2008, applies IE’s values of innovation, global vision and entrepreneurship to the endlessly rich field of arts and humanities. Its mission outlines how its education and values not only resonate with the most sophisticated current visions of education, but how it will also make IE a key future player in the field of arts and humanities. IE´s School of Arts and Humanities is based on the culture of innovation, as well as on the humanistic values of independence, tolerance, respect for diversity and ethics, and the promotion of the civic values that call upon us to respect and work with our equals, care for the environment and work towards improving society as a whole. The school’s basic pillars are the freedom of inquiry, and the freedom of expression, and these fundamental tenets are underpinned by a culture of academic integrity, ethical conduct and civil debate. This development reflects not only the pioneering and international aspects of the School’s mission, but also the interest of international community to take part in it.

If you wish to learn more about the programs IE School of Arts & Humanities has to offer, please visit their home.

31
Jul

Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWF): Heroes or Villains?

Written on July 31, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

1554.jpgJuly 2008 | By Juan Pedro Gomez, Professor at IE Business School

They are about liquidity and a desire to invest millions in leading international banks in order to leverage the subprime crisis. They are sovereign wealth funds, the new focus of debate in the western world.

In February, the Qatary Investment Authority (QIA), the Qatar governmentâ??s investment fund, purchased between 1 and 2% of the Swiss bank Credit Suisse. More recently, rumours of investments by the same fund in the Royal Bank of Scotland increased the British bank´s share price by 5% on the London Stock Exchange on 25 February.

In January this year, Merrill Lynch and Citigroup received a total of $21 thousand million from sovereign wealth funds (SWF) from the Middle East and Asia. Overall, according to Morgan Stanley, since the liquidity crisis began in August last year, more than $69 thousand million have been invested by SWF in financial groups in developed countries. There is not the slightest doubt that the money has been welcome, not only by the banks (who continue to lower the market value of mortgage portfolios and their derivatives), but also by the market as a whole, anxious for liquidity and stability. So far, SWFs are heroes.
At the same time, leaders such as Nicolas Sarkozy and Angela Merkel have promised to protect their investors and managers from the “aggressive practices” of these funds.

The president of the European Commission, Durao Barroso, commented that “we cannot allow non-European funds to be used to carry out geopolitical strategies”. The European Commission has recently approved a proposal for the SWF to voluntarily subscribe to corporate government and transparency policies that are common in Western economies. And now, it would seem that for political managers and legislators they are villains.

Who is behind these funds? Are they a recent phenomenon? Should we be concerned about their movements? Are they heroes or villains? Read more…

30
Jul

IE Multimedia: innovation and interactivity

Written on July 30, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Go for IE

multimedia11.jpgIn recent years there has been a marked increase in the use of multimedia materials in the educational sector. IE Business School foresaw this trend when it created its e-learning unit back in 2001 for the explicit purpose of the production of multimedia materials. The resulting games simulators, interactive graphs and tutorials serve to support onsite, blended and online programs at IE Business School. Innovation and interactivity are the basic principles that have led the unit to develop some 200 items in all areas of management. The growing quantity of multimedia material used each year is very well received by our students and faculty. For more information visit the online catalogue at www.ie.edu/multimedia.

If you wish to see, how the multimedia cases are developed and imparted, please watch this video.


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29
Jul

What drives enterprise: talent or motivation?

Written on July 29, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

1551.jpgJuly 2008 | By Javier Roza, Professor at IE Business School

The alignment of markets and companies is an inevitable result of globalization, but a highly motivated team can gain competitive advantages by breaking the mould.

Let us accept for a moment that multinational business sets the latest trends in management. In this type of environment, country managers do not normally generate product innovation or communication on an individual basis; they are usually not even responsible for production, and in some cases they do not produce their own organisational design. In this situation, local responsibility consists of implementing the strategies developed centrally.

Let us also accept that countries in the same geopolitical environment have a similar level of development and that the consumer pattern is one of convergence. Enterprises also converge in terms of the brands and products they market. Systems and processes are also global. Even the type and quality of employees are becoming more and more consistent owing to the similarity of recruitment and promotion processes. And to cap it all, competitors are the same in each country, complete with globalised strategies.

Furthermore, technical capacities are increasingly reaching the same level. It is becoming more and more difficult to gain a sustainable competitive advantage through technology. When a new product triumphs, competitors rapidly appear with similar products and more competitive offers. Read more…

28
Jul

IE Professors Talk – David Allen

Written on July 28, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Go for IE

Prof. David Allen is talking about Leadership and his approach of teaching. Enjoy!

25
Jul

Why are online MBAs not cheaper than traditional ones?

Written on July 25, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in Go for IE

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/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Tabla normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} At IE Business School we have developed in recent years a strong capacity in the development and delivery from online programs due to the growing demand from both candidates as well as corporations.

As you certainly screened the market, you have seen a wide range of online MBA programs. Some of them are delivered in the often-believed only possible “download-print-out and study on your own” format. These kind of programs seldom involve interaction with both classmates and professors and you might get together just only for the exam period. This category of online programs falls under the Internet scheme – less intermediaries, less interaction with people and therefore cheaper.

When IE started to research and develop its own online methodology in 2001 the only premise was “How can we transform the physical classroom with the continuous and enriching interaction between students and professors into a virtual classroom maintaining the case study method maintaining the same or even higher level of quality?”
And with what we came up with, was an online platform with forums and private rooms (plus many other features) where students can discuss exactly the same cases as in the face to face programs. Team discussions are made in 2-3 days without any intervention from the professors and class discussions are done in another 2-3 days. So, a normal session in an online program last about one week instead of 90 minutes in a face-to-face program. Therefore, the dedication of the professor is higher than in traditional programs, being this a critical cost driver in online programs. The faculty we use for our online programs is the same as in the face-to-face programs, so they are teaching both methodologies. Additionally, class sizes are also reduced to about 30 students per class. So, the exposure of students to the professor is more relevant at the same time providing students in that way a higher interaction opportunity with an increased learning outcome.

To sum up, top quality online education follows the same price standards as the traditional methodology since there is no concession of quality. You can be sure of the same selection criteria and standards during the admissions process, you can expect the same student profile, you will have the same faculty as in the face-to-face program and, of course, we use the same cases for the class discussion.

24
Jul

Written on July 24, 2008 by Dirk Hopfl in IE University

imagen1.jpgIE Business School is set to invest around â?¬14 million in the former convent of Santa Cruz la Real in Segovia to convert the building and the adjoining land into an international business university equipped with state-of-the-art technology. The project aims to make IE University a European benchmark for quality.

 

The venue chosen for IEâ??s university project is the former convent of Santa Cruz la Real, a building which was declared a national monument in 1931 and is one of the architectural gems of the city of Segovia. The restoration project for the building, which is located by the city wall and is very close to the aqueduct, was presented at a press conference in July by Miguel Sagüés, IE Universityâ??s managing director, and the architects Fernando Serrano-Suñer and Ismael Rodriguez.

 

The whole restoration project involves five phases which will take in the buildingâ??s 18,000 m² surface area, in addition to a plot of land covering 30,000 m² adjacent to the former convent. Restoration work began a year ago on the communal areas of the ground floor such as the cloister, the chapterhouse, the refectory hall and the dormitories. This summer, work will focus on the universityâ??s lecture halls and include fitting automated lighting and sound systems in order to save energy while respecting the structure of the building. According to the architect, Fernando Serrano-Suñer, work on each of these two phases will cover a surface area of around 4,000 m².

 

After these first two stages, a third phase of restoration work will begin in 2009 and include a complete renovation project which will be presented to the Segovia City Council and the Heritage Commission during the next few days so that they can assess its feasibility. This phase will include work on the interior design and furnishings and will supplement the work carried out during the first two phases. It will also involve work on the outside of the building and the facades and a glass roof for the complexâ??s two characteristic courtyards. During the press conference, Fernando Serrano-Suñer insisted that the restoration work would â??respect the buildingâ??s heritageâ? at all times and stressed that in the case of the facades, which are at present in a very poor state of repair, the aim was to â??restore them to their former splendourâ?. Read more…

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