Only two days

The Other Side | By Felix Valdivieso, Director of Communication, IE Business School Some say imagine how bad work is that they have to pay you to do it… But joking aside, the good news is that at times there are things you do at work, and people you meet, that you would anyway, just…


Hot Market Dog

The Other Side | By Felix Valdivieso, Director of Communication, IE Business School Marketing Prof. Martin Boehm is not a market dog himself, but he loves hot dogs. In this video he explains how the market works while enjoying a hot dog in New York. Playing a sort of devil’s advocate, he proposes that we stop…


Google: Was Motorola a bad deal?

IE Focus | By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School

Google bought Motorola for 12.5 billion dollars, invested in it to make it competitive and then sold it for  2.91 million, keeping its patent portfolio. A tale of success or failure?

Google has sold its Motorola mobile phone business to Lenovo for 2.91 billion dollars, thereby demonstrating that hardware, although it plays a crucial role in strategy development, is seen by the company as being a factor that is somewhere between marginal and accidental.

Google’s acquisition of Motorola was one of the biggest surprises of the summer of 2011. Google paid 12.5 billion for a legendary manufacturer that had come down in the world, but which had a massive portfolio of patents that could be fundamental in navigating the complex scenario of litigations the company was thinking of launching at the time.

Moreover, the acquisition posed a problem. If Google’s strategy with Android was to make itself attractive to all  Smartphone producers, how would said producers feel about the fact that the company that was selling them something as vital as an operating system would also be competing against them through its own newly acquired handset manufacturer? Becoming a mobile phone manufacturer was a dangerously incoherent move by Google.


Who’s Got the Top Jobs?

Monika Hamori, Professor of Human Resource Management at IE Business School, explains her research findings recently published in a Harvard Business Review article “Who’s Got the Top Jobs,” which she coauthored with IE Business School Professor Rocio Bonet and the Wharton School’s Peter Cappelli. Prof. Hamori’s research focuses on the career paths and career success…


Get insights into the IE-SMU MBA

A blended program sounds abstract and difficult to catch. MOOCs help to get the idea to study a program mostly online and gain valuable knowledge, industry insights and network through it. But still doubts remain… The following presentation on the IE-SMU MBA, an educational fusion created by IE Business School and Singapore Management University, gives…