Toledo: a city of three cultures

The Other Side | By Felix Validvieso, Director of Communication, IE Business School Operations and finance professor Alber Sabanoglu Segura comes from Turkey, and he is also a Sephardic Jew. Hence we decided that there was no better place to shoot this video than the ancient Jewish quarter in Toledo. When the Sephardic Jews were expelled from Spain…


The Socratic value of MOOCs

IE Focus | By Rolf Strom-Olsen. Academic Director of Humanities Studies at IE Humanities Center

The rise of MOOCs and the fact that they are open to all and free of charge has caused great consternation in the academic world. Socrates, however, would have approved.

In the brief introductory video of my MOOC (Critical Perspectives on Management) that we put together to walk through the class syllabus, I make the point that, as a Humanities course masquerading as a strategy class, the methodological inspiration derives from those two fundamental tenets of the Socratic imperative: that true wisdom consists in knowing you do not know and that the unexamined life is not worth living.

But while these two sentiments of the Socratic imperative are certainly the best known and serve as the fons et origo of humanist enquiry, there is a third, equally critical, part of the Socratic imperative that I had to leave out (since the video was testing weary viewers’ patience already).

It’s this bit, from the Apology.


Only two days

The Other Side | By Felix Valdivieso, Director of Communication, IE Business School Some say imagine how bad work is that they have to pay you to do it… But joking aside, the good news is that at times there are things you do at work, and people you meet, that you would anyway, just…


Hot Market Dog

The Other Side | By Felix Valdivieso, Director of Communication, IE Business School Marketing Prof. Martin Boehm is not a market dog himself, but he loves hot dogs. In this video he explains how the market works while enjoying a hot dog in New York. Playing a sort of devil’s advocate, he proposes that we stop…


Google: Was Motorola a bad deal?

IE Focus | By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School

Google bought Motorola for 12.5 billion dollars, invested in it to make it competitive and then sold it for  2.91 million, keeping its patent portfolio. A tale of success or failure?

Google has sold its Motorola mobile phone business to Lenovo for 2.91 billion dollars, thereby demonstrating that hardware, although it plays a crucial role in strategy development, is seen by the company as being a factor that is somewhere between marginal and accidental.

Google’s acquisition of Motorola was one of the biggest surprises of the summer of 2011. Google paid 12.5 billion for a legendary manufacturer that had come down in the world, but which had a massive portfolio of patents that could be fundamental in navigating the complex scenario of litigations the company was thinking of launching at the time.

Moreover, the acquisition posed a problem. If Google’s strategy with Android was to make itself attractive to all  Smartphone producers, how would said producers feel about the fact that the company that was selling them something as vital as an operating system would also be competing against them through its own newly acquired handset manufacturer? Becoming a mobile phone manufacturer was a dangerously incoherent move by Google.