Posts Tagged ‘Strategy#8217;

5
May

Google: Was Motorola a bad deal?

Written on May 5, 2014 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

IE Focus | By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School

Google bought Motorola for 12.5 billion dollars, invested in it to make it competitive and then sold it for  2.91 million, keeping its patent portfolio. A tale of success or failure?

Google has sold its Motorola mobile phone business to Lenovo for 2.91 billion dollars, thereby demonstrating that hardware, although it plays a crucial role in strategy development, is seen by the company as being a factor that is somewhere between marginal and accidental.

Google’s acquisition of Motorola was one of the biggest surprises of the summer of 2011. Google paid 12.5 billion for a legendary manufacturer that had come down in the world, but which had a massive portfolio of patents that could be fundamental in navigating the complex scenario of litigations the company was thinking of launching at the time.

Moreover, the acquisition posed a problem. If Google’s strategy with Android was to make itself attractive to all  Smartphone producers, how would said producers feel about the fact that the company that was selling them something as vital as an operating system would also be competing against them through its own newly acquired handset manufacturer? Becoming a mobile phone manufacturer was a dangerously incoherent move by Google. Read more…

29
Jun

The MBA is about inspiration and electricity!

Written on June 29, 2013 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

Germano Air ChinaSome of IE Business School’s most outstanding alumni are working in Asia, and this week Joël McConnell, IE’s Director of International Development for Asia Pacific, caught up with Germano Rollero: an International MBA graduate based in Beijing who is currently working for one of China’s major civilian aviation companies.

JM: What brought you to China, and what are you doing professionally right now?
GR: I came to China because I’ve always been fascinated by this country, so much so in fact that I chose Chinese as my Major subject during my undergraduate degree. Not surprisingly the majority (I’d say about 90%) of my professional career has taken place here in China.
Currently I’m part of the Global Corporate Accounts team at Air China International, the most important Chinese carrier. Air China is a state-owned enterprise and it has been one of the most profitable airlines in the world for each of the last 5 years. Consequently, the company is ambitiously growing beyond China’s borders. It’s very interesting being part of a company that is growing globally so quickly, it almost feels like I’m a pioneer, or better said: part of a team of entrepreneurs at a start up that has 25.000 employees.
In my everyday work I supervise the efforts of our offices around the world, with the objective of improving our service and growing our revenues from primarily global Fortune 500 corporate clients. I do also business development globally to find new corporate clients, signing global deals with them. Our team is at the forefront in making Air China a more global airline.

JM: How did your MBA experience at IE Business School help you get to where you are today?
GR: The MBA helped me because it made more confident and outspoken. I am not a finance major, I was not working in investment banking or in strategy consulting before the MBA, but some of my classmates covered these topics. At the beginning, I was kind of more reserved when expressing my own views about the cases discussed in class and our work groups because my classmates had more knowledge about these subjects. After some time though I realized that my fresh take and views on the cases were adding a lot of values to the discussions, actually many times much more value than the views of my more experienced peers. I gained more self-confidence and I became more capable of establishing a vision and of instilling enthusiasm in others.
My MBA experience helped me at Air China, in fact in addition to my day-to-day job I am asked to attend many other project team meetings related to the future of the company, because of my ability to express new ideas and points of view about complicated problems and unclear situations.

JM: What do you remember most fondly about living in Madrid?
GR: Without a doubt the friends I made at IE. It was great to be surrounded by so many wonderful people full of enthusiasm and creativity. You feel so much inspiration and electricity on campus, and Madrid helps you to bond with them, given the many opportunities to network and have fun in the city. Furthermore, after the MBA you become even closer with all your peers. Even though they’re scattered around the world, you know you can count on them should you need to ask them for help.

JM: Any tips on applying to the program, especially with regards to the admissions application?
GR: Focus on your dreams and on what you want to achieve after the MBA, and you will find the enthusiasm and the motivation to go through all the steps of the application. It’s tough, but the MBA experience at IE is worth it!

JM: Where do you see yourself in 2 years?
GR: I see myself in an overseas assignment with Air China, leading globalization efforts in foreign markets to help Air China to become one of the best airlines worldwide.

30
Jan

Just in time – decision making in the supermarket

Written on January 30, 2013 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

The Other Side | By Felix Valdivieso, Director of Communication at IE Business School

Just as Just in Time could be either a very popular song or a production strategy designed to maximize business return on investment, Prof. Daniel Corsten could be either the most knowledgeable management professor around or the most enthusiastic person on earth doing what he loves to do, which happens to be singing for you. Knowledge and enthusiasm is certainly a powerful combination.

Don’t miss what he has to say about how we make decisions when we’re shopping, why supermarket shelves are organized the way they are, and why just in time is so important both in business and in life.

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26
Nov

Business in 4 colours: CMYK

Written on November 26, 2012 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

As you probably know, CMYK stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black, namely the four base ink colors. In offset and digital printing the CMYK ink colors are applied to paper in successive layers. By overlapping the four colors in varying concentrations, a huge number of other colors can be created. As a result, the combined visual effects of the four CMYK colors produce what we commonly call full color printing. I believe that the visions of the four professors featured in this video serve in much the same way as “base colors” for developing thought in the field of management. They basically address two issues – what could be considered the most important management subject, and whether the world is seeing a shift in its center of gravity. Prof. de l´Etraz disagrees with Dean Iniguez, and Prof. D´Souza disagrees with Dean Boehm. It seems that agreement is just not their thing. Check out what they have to say!

1
Nov

IE MasterClass || The World of the Future

Written on November 1, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

What will the future look like? What are the challenges that society will have to face? The future is the consequence of our current actions. Studying the future could allow us to anticipate consequences and choose courses of action that can lead us to desirable scenarios. This session is not an exercise of prediction but an opportunity to discuss the main issues that are molding the years ahead. Is Globalization reversible? Are we facing a technological revolution? What consequences will current events have on society and business?

Enjoy two engaging sessions with our Professor William Davila in Australia:

Sydney – November 22, 2011 – Four Points by Sheraton, Darling Harbour

Melbourne – November 24, 2011 – The Hub, Level 3 – 673 Bourke Street

For more details, please visit the IE Event Page

16
Aug

We would like to take this opportunity to invite you to a Master Class titled “Creating Competitive Advantage Beyond the Market”, taking place in Manila:

Date: Saturday, August 27, 2011
Time: 11:30 – 13:30
Venue: Makati Shangri-La, Ayala Avenue cnr.  Makati Avenue, Makati City 1200
Registration: IE Event Page

In a more complicated and increasingly globalized world, mastering markets is no longer enough. This session will show how companies and their bottom lines are increasingly affected by government policy, changing regulations, activist pressure, and media scrutiny – anywhere in the world and often instantaneously. How can and should companies respond to these growing “nonmarket” pressures? The session will highlight both challenges and opportunities of strategic nonmarket management and leave participants with a fuller picture of the realities of global management in the 21st century.

This Master Class will be lead by Prof. Dr. David Bach, Professor of Strategy and Economic Environment and Dean of Programs at IE Business School. The main focus of David Bach’s teaching and research activities is about the point where business and politics meet. “Politics has always been important for business,” he says, “but owing to globalisation and new demands on companies, executives must more than ever engage in skilful political management.” Professor Bach is an expert in political economy, business-government relations, and nonmarket strategy and has published widely in leading academic journals and with practitioner publications including the Sloan Management Review, Financial Times. His work on the nexus of business and politics has twice earned him a spot as ‘one to watch’ for the Thinkers 50 ranking of leading global business thinkers. In 2011, he was named one of the top 40 business school professors under 40.

6
May

IE Event || Marketing the Subconscious

Written on May 6, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

“The Art of Seduction ― Marketing the Subconscious” will explore the history and theory of appealing emotionally to potential clients and customers, and discuss ways to do so. 

The seminar, hosted by Seoul Global Center, will feature a guest talk from Prof. William Davila, Associate Professor of marketing at Madrid’s IE Business School, which specializes in entrepreneurship, innovation, and strategy. 

IE’s Korean academic partners include KAIST Business School, Seoul National University, and Sogang University Business School. 

There will also be a question and answer session after the talk. The event runs from 6 p.m. to 9p.m. on May 13 at COEX. Reservation is required. To reserve a place or find out more call (02) 6001-7242 or email joychei@sba.seoul.kr.

15
Aug

Can Nokia compete with the iPad?

Written on August 15, 2010 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

IE Focus | By Ricardo Perez, Professor at IE Business School

Nokia is still a leader in terms of sales, but the crown of innovation has now passed to Apple. In order to get it back, Nokia needs to reinvent itself as a mobile services company that offers multiple benefits to its partners. At the last world mobiles congress in Barcelona, Nokia and Intel revealed their plans for the joint development of software for all kinds of devices to compete with Apple and Google. Nokia takes another step forward in its strategy of creating a technological platform that returns it to a position that will enable it to take the initiative in the most interesting market at the present time, i.e. smart phones like the iPhone, and in new markets, such as the one created recently by the iPad. Don´t worry, I won’t go on about the iPad; what I want to speak about is Nokia and its position in today´s market. It is a story of what can happen to a leading company if it comes up with the wrong definition of the business game it is playing. The loss of leadership this causes has happened to others: it has happened to Sony with its music players and its video consoles over the last two years. Nokia had worked hard to create the different technological platforms it believed would enable it to win in the mobile market. Symbian, its key product, has also seen defeat. Allow me to explain.

Nokia established the rules for the top-of-the-range telephone market before iPhone. It created an alliance to produce the base software (operating system) with which telephones worked (Symbian, theoretically neutral and owned by many companies on the market). It also made sure that what users saw on the telephone when they used the menus (user interface) was the development and property of each of Symbian´s partners, which meant it could not enter the market as a competitor. The rules were clear and benefited Nokia in a market that competed in terms of the electronics and “additional utilities” of the telephone (best camera, GPS, etc.). Read more…

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