Posts Tagged ‘Social Media#8217;

29
Oct

The value of conversations

Written on October 29, 2012 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

IE Focus | By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School

The Internet is a permanently ongoing conversation in which people recommend, redirect, provide links, etc. The value of your website depends on how involved you are in this conversation.

One of the main advantages of a solid Internet presence is its capacity to serve as a subject of conversation. Today, everything is about conversation. A campaign, a product launch, the publication of findings, or an appearance on the news, are only worth as much as their capacity to take center stage in a permanently ongoing conversation in which we all participate.

Technology has lowered barriers to entry in the publishing sector to the extent that today an enormous number of people are now able to be constantly involved in that particular conversation. The consequences of this are clear: the value of your brand is directly related to the extent to which it features in said conversation.

Contrary to what company directors may think after decades of unidirectional marketing, the conversation cannot be controlled. The most you can hope for is to be one of the voices taking part. If your web presence is good enough, the people talking about you will have a place to link up with each other when they do. They will be able to include a link to a relevant part of your website in their comments, where it is possible to find information that is permanently available (nobody wants to provide a link to information that disappears after a certain amount of time, and only serves to bring up a message saying “Error 404: not found”) and interesting references (information on products, photos, logos, comment, reactions, etc.). Read more…

18
Apr

This pilot project’s objective was to develop the digital presence of students of the Global MBA with the help of digital tools. Personal Branding also forms part of Reputation Management in the digital environment and is an important pending task for managers.

About.me is a free service that allows the creation of very aesthetic one-page website about persons and their interests. Users are able to upload a photo, write a short bio and add their favourite social networks to show the world the picture of them.

These dynamic launch pages direct visitors to their content from around the web. It also details how many people see their profile, where they’re coming from, and their interactions with the page.

As the professor David Gracia mentions:
“The web is becoming more and more social and the content is created primarily by the very users. In this context brands cannot choose whether to be or not to be in social networks, they will be there anyway. If you think about yourself as a brand the same principle applies. The question is not IF you want to be in the Internet but HOW you want to be there. In this course, students can learn how to manage both their personal and professional identity in social networks in order to build a digital identity that is aligned with the image they want to convey about themselves.”

Some examples of the students could be found here:
http://aboutme2012.wikispaces.com/

12
Apr

How to build and orchestrate your Digital Identity?

Written on April 12, 2012 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

With a continuously growing impact of social media in our personal and professional life’s, there is no way back NOT to think about building and orchestrating your digital identity.

In the upcoming seminar series in South East Asia (dates below), we will highlight certain social media and the way you should use them in your job search. We will show you how IE supports its students and alumni in the digital identity building and how to manage it wisely for the next step of your professional development.

Are you ready for the future?

View more presentations from IE
Feel free to register for the upcoming events:

Enjoy the sessions and good luck for your job search!

1
Apr

IE Focus || Causes

Written on April 1, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School, published on IE Focus

Social networks have the capacity to mobilize millions of people in defense of a cause, regardless of their location. The far-reaching impact of this is now starting to show.The expansion of social networks has had one extremely interesting effect: the proliferation of causes or claims capable of garnering the support of a large number of people, sometimes very quickly. When this occurs, the person promoting the cause in question cites the number of people involved as evidence of support, whereas sceptics and detractors try to downplay it by talking about of the scant value of support provided by merely using an index finger to click on a mouse. 

Who should we believe? Can we consider this type of group as tangible evidence of support, the virtual equivalent of a street demonstration with banners and slogans, or does the practically zero effort required to support the cause mean it is worth very little? The social importance of this issue is growing as the number of social network users increases: Spain has the highest number of social networks users in the world (according to the latest figures, we are talking about around ten million active users on Facebook and around eight million on Tuenti). As a result, many are starting to see social networks as a kind of “trend laboratory” or a gauge for measuring the “social mood”, a kind of permanent, real-time survey on the widest possible variety of subjects. Read more…

24
Mar

IE Focus || Social web and involvement

Written on March 24, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School, published on IE Focus

One of the key factors driving the boom in so-called social media is customer involvement, now the subject of extensive study.One of the main drivers of the boom of the so-called social media is so-called customer involvement. This represents a measure of how far the customer gets involved with the sender of the message, and is now the subject of extensive study.

Have you ever considered the general effect your messaging has on your target public? In a world full of media that is technologically limited to being unidirectional, the answer to this question was very inexact: we could only find out by using panels or surveys, which were always approximate, and we were unable to associate the answer with specific subjects or try to measure it in purely binary terms: one, buys the product or service, or zero, doesn´t buy it. This absence of information means that communication via the net can be measured or evaluated in a large number of ways that businesses are starting to discover. 

On the social web, users´ reactions are gauged by that fundamental variable: involvement. The minimum involvement of a user in terms of content is to simply “watch it go by”; the content appears and the user simply moves on to something else without interacting with it. Display advertising, for example, is a clear case of this: we can´t even be sure of whether or not the user has actually seen it or stopped to look at it. In fact, display advertising is a luxury in comparison with other media: we can at least know whether or not a specific user has received the impact and then act accordingly. In the press, we can only know the number of newspapers that have been sold and, on television, we have to trust a frugal scattering of audience meters that provide measurements that are poor and few and far between, but which everyone decides to believe since there is nothing better. Read more…

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