Economic Journalism in Asia: Contest

IE Business School launches its first edition of the Asian version of the Economic Journalism contest. The contest attracted 1000 journalist in its 3rd edition in Latin America and recognizes the article and media that best fosters economic culture among the population of the country in question by explaining how global trends and movements are impacting the spending power of its citizens.

The last 20 years have seen unprecedented levels of development and economic transformation in practically all the countries in the Asian continent. This growth is evidenced not only by macroeconomic figures but also by the change in the day-to-day lives of hundreds of millions of Asians, duly documented and chronicled by the media in countries throughout Asia. These narratives of the different phases of economic growth include accounts of the first arrivals of foreign business, mass exportation to the West, and the major inroads made by Asian multinationals in the rest of the world since the year 2000, not only in the form of exports but also in terms of purchases and production in every continent.

The media has born witness to and provided a running commentary on this success story, providing reflection and making its own contribution to the growth process.

As the countries of Asia have undergone economic growth, Asian media organizations have assigned ever greater numbers of journalists to coverage of this field and have increased the size their economy sections significantly. The proliferation of dailies and journals specialized in business and economy, along with websites and/or television channels, is a further sign of a society and market that is growing.

The press has played a key role in strengthening the economy, because thanks to news published about successful business corporations, new production technology or other related information of interest, it has helped to inform and educate the population about finance, business opportunities. An increasingly large middle class needs more information of this type in order to take important decisions. Without economic journalists and business press there is no social well-being and growth.


7 reasons to invest more in Corporate Communication

How can you convince top managers to invest more in corporate communication? Experts from top leading institutions give their opinion and provide us with good arguments on why corporate communication is important . Hereafter some quotations from the video “The importance of Corporate Communication”. – “Companies understood that communication has to be supported  by behavior, […] making a…


IE University student joins UNESCO video challenge

The Communications student at IE University Susana Restrepo Arias has presented an audiovisual work to the contest “International Video Challenge for youth”, which UNESCO organizes from young people around the world in order to promote respect for cultural diversity as key part of human development. The competition offers young people the challenge of expressing the importance…


The Power of the Word

Words are human, substantially human. They link our thoughts to reality and to other thoughts. Thanks to words, others know what we are thinking or what we want to say. Depending on how skilful we are with words, we succeed or fail in reaching others, obtaining personal or collective benefits, and building the future.

No matter how knowledgeable they are, no matter how intelligent they are, people who do not express themselves very well are at a disadvantage. Words are effectiveness.

Our thoughts are made up of words. As we progress in the art of the word, we learn to think better, we acquire mental skills that we did not have previously because the brain develops with language, and if we train and teach the word, the brain increases its muscle power.

Our brain deals with images, sensations, all kinds of memories and an endless array of words. Our language brings all that together. The word and the action are what best reveal what we are and what we want to be. People who do not use words well act as if they have had their strongest member amputated.