Posts Tagged ‘Academics#8217;

26
Nov

Business in 4 colours: CMYK

Written on November 26, 2012 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

As you probably know, CMYK stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black, namely the four base ink colors. In offset and digital printing the CMYK ink colors are applied to paper in successive layers. By overlapping the four colors in varying concentrations, a huge number of other colors can be created. As a result, the combined visual effects of the four CMYK colors produce what we commonly call full color printing. I believe that the visions of the four professors featured in this video serve in much the same way as “base colors” for developing thought in the field of management. They basically address two issues – what could be considered the most important management subject, and whether the world is seeing a shift in its center of gravity. Prof. de l´Etraz disagrees with Dean Iniguez, and Prof. D´Souza disagrees with Dean Boehm. It seems that agreement is just not their thing. Check out what they have to say!

17
Oct

IE-Brown University International Teaching Fellowship

Written on October 17, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

IE University and Brown University invites candidates from the humanities to apply for the International Teaching Fellowship (ITF) for the academic year 2012-13. The ITF provides the opportunity to teach in Spain at IE University in Segovia, Spain as a fellow of the School of Arts and Humanities. The fellow will also be affiliated with the Cogut Center for the Humanities at Brown University. The fellowship offers the opportunity to develop and implement innovative curricula in one of Europe’s foremost professional degree-granting institutions while also providing time for research and career development.

DESCRIPTION
IE University is the undergraduate affiliate institution of IE Business School, based in Madrid. The IE International MBA is regularly ranked in the top-ten worldwide and its specialized Masters programs are recognized globally. The undergraduate program, launched in 2009, has been designed to bring the excellence of the graduate school to undergraduate teaching. IE’s undergraduate student body is extremely diverse, with no single dominant national or linguistic group.

IE University offers a unique liberal arts model of education in the heart of Europe, with an emphasis on small class sizes and student-faculty exchange. The School of Arts and Humanities is at the very heart of IE’s mission, as the courses it offers form part of all the undergraduate and postgraduate programs at the University.

In addition to the faculty life found within the University, fellows may also profit from IE’s connections to the wider academic environment in Madrid, including important libraries (e.g. Biblioteca Nacional), leading museums (e.g. Thyssen, Prado), Foundations (e.g. Juan March), Research Centres (e.g. CSIC), and neighbouring Universities (e.g. Universidad Complutense).

TEACHING
Fellows will join the IE claustro (faculty) to teach the equivalent of two courses in a blended seminar/lecture format.  The course curriculum should reflect the interests and strength of the fellow, as well as the pedagogical aims of IE´s undergraduate program; curricula will be developed in collaboration with the IE School of Arts and Humanities. Because of the diverse nature of IE’s degree programs, fellows will likely have the opportunity to teach either two standard, semester-length undergraduate courses, or one such class combined with short, structured courses in the graduate program. In total, the fellow will be responsible for 130 contact hours and no more than two curricula. The language of instruction is English and knowledge of Spanish is not required. More information about IE’s teaching structure as well as general information about the institution can be found on our website.

For more infromation click here

3
Oct

The 360º teaching experience

Written on October 3, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

Who tells that the class room cannot be a circle? Prof. David Bach teaches in a new learning environment.

Last July, Professor David Bach, Professor of Strategy and Economic Environment and Dean of Programs, taught an optional Business Government and Society class under a new learning environment.

The “Open Space” room, at Maria de Molina 4, has been set up as you can observe in the photo. Students sit in two half circles around the professor. Four flat screens (two on each wall) show slides, with the professor able to manipulate these from a tablet PC. Under this method the class is more dynamic and communicative and less unidirectional. As one participant puts it: “This new layout fosters participation and interaction and could be superior in an array of class situations.”

The professor is able to walk through the middle of the class, or to sit in one of the half cycles to form part of the group.Professor Bach describes this new teaching experience in the following way: “This situation is much more collaborative, the class is coming closer and students are not obliged to look in one single direction, as there are 2 flatscreens on each row. The professor can write on the tablet PC from anywhere and the message is visible from all angles. ” It is possible that this experimental setting will be integrated in new learning experiences at IE Business School in the future.

[First published on IE Learning Experiences Blog]

16
Aug

We would like to take this opportunity to invite you to a Master Class titled “Creating Competitive Advantage Beyond the Market”, taking place in Manila:

Date: Saturday, August 27, 2011
Time: 11:30 – 13:30
Venue: Makati Shangri-La, Ayala Avenue cnr.  Makati Avenue, Makati City 1200
Registration: IE Event Page

In a more complicated and increasingly globalized world, mastering markets is no longer enough. This session will show how companies and their bottom lines are increasingly affected by government policy, changing regulations, activist pressure, and media scrutiny – anywhere in the world and often instantaneously. How can and should companies respond to these growing “nonmarket” pressures? The session will highlight both challenges and opportunities of strategic nonmarket management and leave participants with a fuller picture of the realities of global management in the 21st century.

This Master Class will be lead by Prof. Dr. David Bach, Professor of Strategy and Economic Environment and Dean of Programs at IE Business School. The main focus of David Bach’s teaching and research activities is about the point where business and politics meet. “Politics has always been important for business,” he says, “but owing to globalisation and new demands on companies, executives must more than ever engage in skilful political management.” Professor Bach is an expert in political economy, business-government relations, and nonmarket strategy and has published widely in leading academic journals and with practitioner publications including the Sloan Management Review, Financial Times. His work on the nexus of business and politics has twice earned him a spot as ‘one to watch’ for the Thinkers 50 ranking of leading global business thinkers. In 2011, he was named one of the top 40 business school professors under 40.

24
May

Who wants to be an Entrepreneur?

Written on May 24, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

Tomorrow is an exciting day for Entrepreneurs and Investors in Singapore. IE Business Schools and Angels Den jointly organized the first IE – Angels Den Seminar on Entrepreneurship. Here are the details:

When? Wednesday, May 25 from 18:00 to 20.45
Where? Pan-Pacific Hotel, Level 1, 7 Raffles Boulevard, Marina Square
Registration: IE Event Page

As follows please find the agenda

View more presentations from IE
1
Apr

IE Focus || Causes

Written on April 1, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School, published on IE Focus

Social networks have the capacity to mobilize millions of people in defense of a cause, regardless of their location. The far-reaching impact of this is now starting to show.The expansion of social networks has had one extremely interesting effect: the proliferation of causes or claims capable of garnering the support of a large number of people, sometimes very quickly. When this occurs, the person promoting the cause in question cites the number of people involved as evidence of support, whereas sceptics and detractors try to downplay it by talking about of the scant value of support provided by merely using an index finger to click on a mouse. 

Who should we believe? Can we consider this type of group as tangible evidence of support, the virtual equivalent of a street demonstration with banners and slogans, or does the practically zero effort required to support the cause mean it is worth very little? The social importance of this issue is growing as the number of social network users increases: Spain has the highest number of social networks users in the world (according to the latest figures, we are talking about around ten million active users on Facebook and around eight million on Tuenti). As a result, many are starting to see social networks as a kind of “trend laboratory” or a gauge for measuring the “social mood”, a kind of permanent, real-time survey on the widest possible variety of subjects. Read more…

26
Mar

IE Focus || Germany 4 – Spain 0

Written on March 26, 2011 by Dirk Hopfl in IE News

By David Bach, Professor at IE Business School, published on IE Focus

Germany has scored more economic goals than Spain because it applied the structural reforms needed before the crisis took hold, and because Merkel, has controlled spending from the start.Spain may have beaten Germany in both the European Football Championship and the World Cup, but where economy is concerned there is no doubt that Germany has the upper hand. Last Thursday´s news that the largest economy on the continent had grown by 3.6% in 2010 (the highest level since the unification in 1990) has surprised even the experts. The Spanish economy, however, closed 2010 with an average reduction of 0.2%. What does Angela Merkel know about economics that the Spanish president doesn’t? One analysis of the German success shows that the causes behind the differences go beyond the current Chancellor´s policies and also clearly point the path Spain should take.

Germany´s economic strength (and Spain´s weakness) is based fundamentally on four pillars: Read more…

9
Dec

The Power of the Word

Written on December 9, 2010 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics, IE University

Words are human, substantially human. They link our thoughts to reality and to other thoughts. Thanks to words, others know what we are thinking or what we want to say. Depending on how skilful we are with words, we succeed or fail in reaching others, obtaining personal or collective benefits, and building the future.

No matter how knowledgeable they are, no matter how intelligent they are, people who do not express themselves very well are at a disadvantage. Words are effectiveness.

Our thoughts are made up of words. As we progress in the art of the word, we learn to think better, we acquire mental skills that we did not have previously because the brain develops with language, and if we train and teach the word, the brain increases its muscle power.

Our brain deals with images, sensations, all kinds of memories and an endless array of words. Our language brings all that together. The word and the action are what best reveal what we are and what we want to be. People who do not use words well act as if they have had their strongest member amputated. Read more…

3
Dec

IE Knowledge Pills: Authentic Leadership

Written on December 3, 2010 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

Prof. Tara Wernsing, professor at IE Business School, is researching on Authentic Leadership. Find out on how this can be developed… adding a bit more to the discussions whether leadership is born or can be taught!

13
Nov

Businesses, customers and small fry

Written on November 13, 2010 by Dirk Hopfl in Academics

IE Focus | By Enrique Dans, Professor at IE Business School

It’s time to put an end to deliberations. If there is anything that really is changing as a direct result of the popularisation of the net and the so-called social web, it is undoubtedly relations between businesses and their customers.

Open your account on Twitter (Sorry? You’re an executive and you still don´t have Twitter or you don´t know what it is?) And write something about well-known large business organizations with millions of customers, such as Telefonica or Iberia, often criticised for their customer service. In a matter of minutes, if what you have said about the company merits a reply, you will quite possibly find it on Twitter. Have a look at the Twitter accounts of Movistar or Iberia… What can you see? Businesses talking directly with their customers and offering to solve their problems. Businesses that listen to the small fry.

It might be a question about items on a bill, explanations about an incident or about an offer: the question is that, after many years of inflexible single-direction trading and contacting customers only to harass them by throwing new products and services in their faces, many businesses are finally starting to use bidirectional communication channels to maintain real relations with their customers. Such relations are much more genuine and make it worthwhile to manage exceptions or speak with a human voice if a problem can be solved and a customer can be satisfied. Trivial? At the moment, more or less testimonial. But undoubtedly a sign of the times. Times in which technology, far from isolating individuals, makes it possible to humanize relations and bring together those who are on both sides of the screen. How can invest millions in expensive CRM systems if our customers then speak about us in public and we pay them no attention? Read more…