Free Competition and Good Strife

IE Focus: Free Competition and Good StrifeIE Focus | By Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui. Professor. IE School of Arts & Humanities
In the light of recent events the dogmas of economic theory have been brought into question, with perhaps one exception: free competition, as defended by the Ancient Greeks.
Many dogmas of classical economical theory have been hastily reviewed in recent times. But I am led to believe that there is one which resists criticism from almost all sides, apart from a few nostalgic diehards. Free competition seems to stand today as a pillar of new and revised models much as it always has from the times of Adam Smith. The first theories on the benefits of competition are, however, much older. In Greece, more than 2,700 years ago, Hesiod began his Works and Days with these lines (see this previous post on translation of ancient poetry).
So there was not only one race of Strifes, but all over the earth
there are two. A man would praise the first one after understanding her.
The other is blameworthy: and their spirit is wholly different.
For one fosters evil war and battle,
being cruel. No man loves her, but men, forced
by the will of the inmortals, pay honour to harsh Strife.
But the other was born the first from dark Night,
and the son of Cronos, who sits above and dwells in the aether, set her
in the roots of the earth: and she is much better for men.
She wakes up even the shiftless to work;
for a man grows eager to work when he sees another
rich man who hastens to plough and plant
and put his house in good order; and neighbour vies with his neighbour
as he hurries after wealth. This Strife is good for mortals
And potter is angry with potter, and craftsman with craftsman,
and beggar is jealous of beggar, and bard of bard.
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IE Business School becomes inaugural CFA Program Partner in Spain

CFA Institute, the global association for investment professionals that awards the prestigious Chartered Financial Analyst® (CFA) designation, is pleased to announce a CFA Program Partnership with IE Business School in Spain. In 2009, the Financial Times Global MBA Rankings ranked IE Business School 3rd in Europe and 6th in the world. IE Business School has…

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International MBA: Change in Action 2009

Between the second and third core periods of the International MBA curriculum, students explore – through a series of presentations from outside experts, online simulation, interactive workshops, group work and on-site company visits – the challenges and opportunities of discontinuous change. Topics will vary each year to include climate change, demographic change, nanotechnology, or the…

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IE Business School and Brown University: New approaches to Academic Entrepreneurship

A joint initiative for research and training for commerce, entrepreneurship and organizational Management IE Business School and Brown University are delighted to announce the formalization of a multifaceted relationship, bringing together one of Europe’s leading business schools and a leading North American research university. Brown and IE share a commitment to academic excellence and to…

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Madrid: more than one million foreigners

Madrid: more than one million foreignersIE Focus | By Rafael Puyol, President IE University

The crisis has affected every level of society, but particularly immigrants. Madrid’s immigrants are faring better than most, however, evidencing that the capital is still an attractive destination for the immigrant population.
The report on the foreign population registered on the Comunidad de Madrid census on 1 January 2009 is very recent and is one of the first documents to show the impact of the crisis on immigration.

Every intuitive guess and forecast for the situation of the foreign population is confirmed in the report, but it applies in Madrid less severely than in other parts of Spain.

The base figures for the analysis are very clear. The first is the slowing-down of growth and, to a certain extent, the absolute reduction of immigrants if the count includes only the last few months. But it is a quasi-symbolic reversal as there are only 159 immigrants less than last October. It is true that the number has fallen and that some have gone, which means that the year-on-year growth is down on other periods. However, consideration must be given to the fact that many foreigners are no longer considered as such because they have been awarded Spanish nationality. Madrid is also unique in this respect, since it accounts for one third of Spain’s nationalisation processes.

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